Guide On How To Install FreeBSD With Manual Disk Partitioning

Guide On How To Install FreeBSD With Manual Disk Partitioning 2017-08-12T13:36:36+02:00

A Step By Step Guide On How To Manual Partition A During FreeBSD Installation
You are probably on this page because you choose this option [screenshot] when asked on how to proceed with the disk setup. Now the manual approach is not something i would recommend for beginners for various reasons, but since you are reading this it must be because you want to give it a try. So I’ll try to guide you though this the best I can.

FreeBSD Disk Partitioning Crash Course For The Impatient

A classic FreeBSD partition scheme consist of 5 partitions

/
/swap
/var
/tmp
/usr

The above does not limit you to 5 partitions however. You could add additional partitions like the example below.

/
/swap
/var
/tmp
/usr
/webpages
/backup

Now because the partitions we’ll create all will end up beeing a fixed size you’ll need to have some sort of idea how much space the different partitions will be using in the long run. It can get a real “PITA” running out of disk space on a production system because you underestimated the disk usage of a partition. And that’s also the reason as of late that I stopped using a custom partitioning scheme.

“Notes On Shrinking / Growing Partitions”

It is theoretically possible to resize (grow partitions in size that is) if there is more space left on the hard drive. The procedure for doing so is quite cumbersome and many people will probably just end up reinstalling. Shrinking partitions is not an option.

A Classic FreeBSD Partition Scheme Size And Usage

/
/swap
/var
/tmp
/usr

/    This is the root file system. It will take up approximately 512 MB on a fresh installation. The total amount used may vary depending on what you are installing later on.
/swap The purpose of this partition should be pretty self explaining.
/var The var partition contains all sort of files My-SQL databases, Qmail and Vpopmail is using this partition as well. It’s also used for all of FreeBSD’s log files.
/tmp The purpose of this partitions should be pretty self explaining. If this partition is not present all tmp files gets written to / “See The Hidden Bombshell Here”
/usr This one is going take up the most disk space. This is where all the binaries, executable’s, programsand most applications goes.

Hard disk space comes utterly cheap these days. And I have never been afraid of using some “overkill” amount of disk space on some of the partitions. This has always helped me sleep well at nights. Now it’s time to put what you learned into practical use. Let’s create some partitions for real in order to continue.

Now depending on how many physical hard drive you have installed in your system you may get the option to choose what hard drive to use for FreeBSD [screenshot]. The numbers handed out by FreeBSD in this guide are as follows da(0) is the first physical hard drive attached to your system da(1) is the second physical hard drive and so on.

The hard drives present on your system may not necessarily be called da(x) it depends on the type of drive i.e. SATA, SCSI whether it’s a RAID configuration SCSI controller brand if present and other factors. The procedure for partitioning the hard drive remains the same though. So pick a hard drive to install FreeBSD on and hit “Create”.

Next you want to select a partition scheme Select “GPT GUID Partition Table” as shown here [screenshot]. You will get a confimation telling you that the partition table has been created [screenshot]. The new screen now displays a GTP partition table [screenshot]. It’s inside this one we will create all the “partitions / slices” we need.

The first partition we will create is the root partition. So select “Create” and fill out the options like this [screenshot]. The “Label is optional” It will also prompt you whether you want to create a boot partition [screenshot] and trust me this is the best time to do this so select yes at that one.

You will be taken back to the partition table main screen [screenshot].

If you are curios you can select options to see what UFS option you have available [screenshot]

The second partition we will create is a “WEBSITE” partition. So select “Create” and fill out the options like this [screenshot].

The third partition will be swap. Once again select “Create” and fill out the options like this [screenshot].

Dont forget the create the last partitions shown below that FreeBSD needs in order to function using the methods just described.

/tmp
/var
/usr

Once you are done click “Finish” and the installer will proceed. To get back to the FreeBSD install guide [click here]

Spell checkers don’t – Grammar checkers don’t either.